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FAST Query Language (FQL) Operators Have Been Incorporated Into the Query Component of SharePoint Server 2013 Search

As Agnes Molnar has demonstrated throughout the video tutorials speaking to the query component of SharePoint Server 2013’s search service, the FAST Query Language (FQL) operator set has been incorporated into this feature.

Proximity operators make up one group within the FQL operator set. Agnes Molnar presents two of the operators from this group, “NEAR” AND “ONEAR”, in Working with Queries, Part 2. As presented in the FAST Query Language (FQL) Syntax Reference on MSDN, “NEAR” “Restricts the result set to items that have N terms within a certain distance of one another” (quoted from the MSDN article). So developers can configure the actual number of terms between targeted results.

“ONEAR” is “[t]he ordered variant of NEAR, and requires an ordered match of the terms.” (ibid). As Agnes explains, this operator permits users to identify text strings conforming to a specified order of terms.

The refiners appearing on the left hand side of the search query page are, in part, automatically produced by the crawler component of the search service. Agnes Molnar spends time in this video tutorial explaining how the different language options appeared in the refiner set shown in her example. In fact, some of the content is written in languages other than English, so the crawler component, as it processes the raw content reposed in SharePoint 2013, provides users with a means of looking at the information by language.

As shown in the example included in the video tutorial, the refiners can be used to limit results to only targeted languages. The crawler applies a weighting to specific languages, and to the proportion of words in specific languages in order to determine the correct language “parent” for a specific piece of content. Where content evenly avails of different languages, then the same content can appear in each language set.

Agnes Molnar goes onto a discussion of advanced search query options in this video, which we will discuss in the next post to this blog.

Ira Michael Blonder

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